Thursday, February 2, 2012

Exponential Technologies: Disruptive influences and rapid advancements in chemistry #ACSSanDiego

Divisions



 SCHB Joseph Sabol  Monday, March 26, 2012 

Oral Session
Exponential Technologies: Disruptive Influences and Rapid Advancements in Chemistry - PM Session

Organizers: Lisa Butters
Presiders: Lisa Butters
Duration: 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm
Pres TimePub #Presentation Title
1:30 pm
Introductory Remarks
1:35 pm6
Digital biology: Life under Moore's Law
Raymond McCauley, The ability to read DNA is in the midst of an unprecedented exponential change. The Human Genome Project took about $300 million and 11 years to complete, we now do for under $5000 in a week, and there's no end in sight. What are the practical applications of this technology? What are the technical and economic trends driving this revolution? How can small, agile companies ride along? And where are we going next?
2:05 pm7
Broadband magnetic signatures of solvated chemistries
Bennett M. Butters, A low temperature SQUID (super conducting quantum interference device) based approach to broadband molecular interrogation is discussed with an emphasis on the technical basis for detection, signal analysis, and the usefulness of acquired data. Also, presented are the analytical results of selected materials and the implications to biochemistry.
2:35 pm8
Nanostructured materials for large and small molecule selectivity
Robert Meagley, We describe work ongoing at ONE Nanotechnologies, LLC to create and refine chemoselective films for application as recognition elements in several sensor platforms. Organic materials and nanocomposites have been developed that allow gas phase and liquid phase detection of explosives and chemical agents. Very high surface area interfaces are achieved through processes suitable for high volume manufacture. Novel strategies enabling high molecular weight precursors to be used in a plasma enhanced deposition mode will be shown. Highly structured surfaces shown to have significant capability to recognize individual proteins from mixtures will be presented and implications for advanced biomarker sensing will be discussed. The thrust of this work illustrates the value of an interdisciplinary approach to advanced material design and integration in devices.
3:05 pm
Intermission
3:15 pm9
Sequencing DNA by looking at it: Seeing chemistry with atoms rather than ensembles of atoms (or, "Why I left a full professorship to join a startup")
Andrew Bleloch,
The development of highly multiplexed sequencing reactions via clonal oligonucleotide clusters has provided the means to reduce the cost of sequencing by roughly five orders of magnitude over the last six years. This "next generation" sequencing has enabled sequencing as a basic tool to inquire the state of DNA variation, the transcriptional levels of the multitude of RNAs, the location of transcriptional cofactors, and many other molecular characteristics that can be expressed as an oligonucleotide. This presentation will summarize the technology and showcase several vignettes of current biological and medical interest.
3:45 pm10
Next generation sequencing: Redefining growth beyond Moore's Law
Scott D. Kahn, The development of highly multiplexed sequencing reactions via clonal oligonucleotide clusters has provided the means to reduce the cost of sequencing by roughly five orders of magnitude over the last six years. This "next generation" sequencing has enabled sequencing as a basic tool to inquire the state of DNA variation, the transcriptional levels of the multitude of RNAs, the location of transcriptional cofactors, and many other molecular characteristics that can be expressed as an oligonucleotide. This presentation will summarize the technology and showcase several vignettes of current biological and medical interest.
4:15 pm
Concluding Remarks

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