Thursday, December 31, 2015

NESACS Public Relations Events 2015



March- STEM Journey II
STEM Journey II on March 28, 2015 was organized by NESACS, Cape & Islands Council of the Boy Scouts of America, and Cape Cod Community College.
Some of the numbers for the STEM Journey II event are shown below:
7 Number of STEM Journey sponsors
150 Scout merit badges in Oceanography, Chemistry, Scientist
100 Volunteers
450 Number of bracelets issued for the 4 Keynote Talks
1,100+ Number of visitors to STEM Journey II

April – Cambridge Science Festival
NESACS participated in the Science Carnival and Robot Zoo at the 2015 Cambridge Science Festival for the fourth consecutive year as a result of a continued relationship from an ACS/NSF grant for an event at the 2012 Cambridge Science Festival to carry on the mission of the International Year of Chemistry. NESACS PR Committee booked two tables: one for resources which included Chemistry Ambassador sashes, Celebrating Chemistry National Chemistry Week and Chemists Celebrate Earth Day handouts and printouts of ACS Resources for Educators including parents who home school grades K-12. Our NSYCC younger chemists Jackie O’Neil and Primrose Nimnark and NESACS PR Committee members, Cosmo Sabatino and Jennifer Maclachlan staffed the ‘ACS’ tables for the duration of the event.

June- Lecture by 2014 Nobel Laurate Prof. Moerner at NESACS Monthly Meeting.
Nobel Laureate (2014) in chemistry, WE Moerner, presented a lecture on his work at Nova Biomedical, Waltham, MA at the  June 2015 NESACS monthly meeting. (http://nesacs.org/pub_nucleus/2015/Summer_Sept%202015NUCLEUS.pdf ). Moerner and his colleagues has made a major contribution to our ability to observe molecules at the smallest scales, opening up new possibilities for discovery in areas ranging from disease management to drug development,” https://www.scribd.com/doc/272176977/Nobel-Laureate-W-E-Moerner-Lectures-at-June-2015-NESACS-Monthly-Meeting 

August
1.    National Historic Chemical Landmark – The ACS National Historic Chemical Landmark (NHCL) dedication was held on Aug. 13, 2015 at the MIT Museum. More than 150 people were in attendance including the ACS President Diane Schmidt, ACS CEO Tom Connelly and the ACS Board of Directors. The speakers included Diane Schmidt, Vice Mayor of Cambridge, Dennis Benzan, Victor McEltheny (Edwin Land’s biographer), Michael Filosa of NESACS. The Plaque was accepted by the director of the MIT Museum, John Durant. Stephen Hershen of Impossible displayed his company’s instant film with rebuild Polaroid cameras. http://nesacs.org/pub_nucleus/2015/Nov15NUCLEUS.pdf
2.    We did receive a Citation from Gov. Baker.
3.    A Symposium (Sponsored by History of Chemistry Div., ACS President and NESACS) on Edwin Land was held at the ACS meeting on Sunday Aug.16. We had 60 people in attendance as 5 former Polaroid employees talked about their experiences at Polaroid.
4.    A Poster session on Edwin Land and Instant photography by Jennifer Maclachlan and Jack Driscoll was given at the Sci Mix Monday Aug. 17 & History of chemistry Div. Poster session on Wed. Aug.19, 2015. We will be posting this on the website
6.    Submitted to the Nucleus

Aug.-
Chemluminary Awards
NESACS received two Chemluminary awards at the ACS National meeting in August 2015.  NESACS http://nesacs.org/pub_nucleus/2015/Nov15NUCLEUS.pdf

Note that NESACS was a finalist for a total of two Chemluminary awards; both of which they received.
The Chemluminary Awards provides members an opportunity to recognize local sections !185 ea), regional meetings, divisions (35 ea) , and international sciences chapters that receive accolades for their tireless efforts and work in promoting chemistry and the chemical sciences in local areas during 2014.
1.     Outstanding Collaboration Between A Division and Local Section

·        Outstanding NCW Event for a Specific Audience


ACS Fellows
Three NESACS members were selected as ACS Fellows and the ACS National Meeting in August 2015.
Sept – Wednesday September 30, 2015: Joint ACS Webinar by the Local Section Activities Committee (LSAC) and Committee on Public Relations and Communications (CPRC) titled: Communicating with the Public about Local Section events. Jennifer Maclachlan, representing CPRC and NESACS, was a webinar presenter on the topic of Social Media and the Local Section. http://analyzersource.blogspot.com/2015/09/communicating-with-public-about-acs.html
Oct. – NCW Boy Scouts Wicked Cool Science Café-
A Science Café was held at the Cape & Islands Boy Scouts of America’s Wicked Cool Autumn Festival. More than 700 attended on Oct. 25, 2015. This event was part of the ACS National Chemistry week.  https://www.scribd.com/doc/292508702/ACS-NCW-2015-Boy-Scouts-Autumn-Festival-2015
Nov. –
In her role as Chair of the Technology Subcommittee for the ACS Committee on Public Relations and Communications (CPRC), Jennifer Maclachlan traveled to the Rochester, NY, together with three members from the ACS Office of Public Affairs, to deliver a Social Media Workshop customized for the Rochester Local Section. Jennifer specifically addressed the social networks Facebook and Linked-In.
Dec.
Jennifer Maclachlan, together with organizers from The Chemical Society of Japan and the Canadian Society for Chemistry organized a two-day symposium on the Connecting Chemistry and Society track at Pacifichem. Symposium title: The evolving nature of scholarly publishing: Connecting scholars to society and to eachother. Topics explored: Traditional journal publishing, open access publishing, connecting your research with the media, social media for small business, social media at a National Lab and navigating social media to connect globally with other scientists. Notable speakers included opening remarks by ACS Executive Director and CEO, Tom Connelly, Bassam Shakhashiri, Paul Weiss, Robin Rogers, Bill Tolman, Bibiana Campos, Bryan Balazs and Pacifichem Plenary speaker, Sam Kean, author of The Disappearing Spoon.

Saturday, December 12, 2015

SCTY: The Evolving Nature of Scholarly Communication: Connecting Scholars with Each Other and with Society (#173) PART III


L to R: CC Young, Frank Manganaro, Jennifer Maclachlan, Jack Driscoll, Tom Connelly, and David Harwell at NOVA Biomedical, Waltham, MA August 2015

PACIFICHEM 2015
SCTY: The Evolving Nature of Scholarly Communication: Connecting Scholars with Each Other and with Society (#173) PART III
303A - Hawaii Convention Center
11.173-3A
8:00am - 12:00pm
Wed, Dec 16
Organizers: J. Maclachlan, A. Williams, K. Hayashi, D. Martinsen, B. Brown
Presiders: Jennifer Maclachlan
Opening Remarks by Tom Connelly, Executive Director and CEO of the American Chemical Society
303A - Hawaii Convention Center
8:00am - 8:05am
56 - Linked-In® and Facebook® for business: Learn how to leverage these powerful social tools
DESCRIPTION:
So you've got a Linked-In® account and have been named an administrator to a Facebook® for business page. Now what? This presentation will teach you how to get the most out of these powerful social networking tools. Learn how to use your Linked-In® account by choosing who to connect with, when to endorse, how to get introduced, how to tag contacts, the advantage of in-mail™ and inspiration for what to post as a status update. For a Facebook® for business page, learn how to craft a status, when to boost a post (for how much, how long and to what audience), when to share and how much to share (it's not Twitter, the tolerance threshold to share too frequently is low), why you should use photos in your posts, how to setup general guidelines for posting when there are multiple account administrators and Facebook® content sharing best practices for scientists. Bring your devices and questions and be ready to leverage these awesome social networking tools for your business, university, scientific society or community organization.
AUTHOR/PRESENTER:
Jennifer Maclachlan, PID Analyzers, LLC, Sandwich
Presenters Raychelle Burks and Jennifer Maclachlan Denver, CO March 2015


57 - Connecting through social media (Part I)
DESCRIPTION:
Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, Instagram, Vine, YouTube, Tumblr … social media platforms have revolutionized the way we communicate and connect. When employed effectively, social media can be an invaluable tool for professional development, networking and personal branding for scientists. Connecting through social media (Part I and II; 1 hour total) will present advice and practical strategies on the effective use of social media platforms, particularly Twitter, to create a professional online presence, for personal branding and career advancement. Part I will feature an interactive panel of scientists and science communicators discussing their experiences in using social media platforms, particularly Twitter, to connect with peers and the general public.
AUTHORS and/or PRESENTERS:
M Monica Feliu-Mojer1 , Raychelle Burks2 , Liz Neeley3 , Danielle Lee4 , Ben Lillie5
1 Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, UC San Francisco / CienciaPR /iBiology, San Francisco, California, United States; 2 Chemistry, Doane College, Crete, Nebraska, United States; 3 COMPASS, Seattle, Washington, United States; 4 Psychology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, United States; 5 The Story Collider, New York, New York, United States, United States
58 - Connecting through social media (Part II)
Connecting through social media (Part I and II; 1 hour total) will present advice and practical strategies on the effective use of social media platforms, particularly Twitter, to create a professional online presence, for personal branding and career advancement. Building on Part I, in Part II session facilitators will work with attendees in small groups or one-or-one to create, revise, and/or evaluate their social media presence for maximum professional development. Attendees are encouraged to bring their laptops, smart phones, and/or tablets.
AUTHORS and/or PRESENTERS:
Monica Feliu-Mojer1 , Raychelle Burks2 , Liz Neeley3 , Danielle Lee4 , Ben Lillie5
1 Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, UC San Francisco / CienciaPR /iBiology, San Francisco, California, United States; 2 Chemistry, Doane College, Crete, Nebraska, United States; 3 COMPASS, Seattle, Washington, United States; 4 Psychology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, United States; 5 The Story Collider, New York, New York, United States
59 - Connecting with the media (Part I)
DESCRIPTION:
In addition to giving research talks, publishing papers and writing grants, scientists are increasingly interacting with members of the media as research and/or field experts, story subjects or sources, and general commenters. Connection with the media (Part I and II; 1 hour total time) will help scientists build the knowledge and skills they need to effectively engage with media members and the general public. Part I will feature (1) a panel of scientists and science communicators discussing their experiences communicating science in the media, along with the advantages of incorporating effective communication skills into their professional toolbox and (2) introduce to the Message Box, a simple but powerful tool to help attendees distill what they know and why it matters.

AUTHORS and/or PRESENTERS:
Raychelle Burks1 , Liz Neeley2 , Monica Feliu-Mojer3 , Danielle Lee5 , Ben Lillie4
1 Chemistry, Doane College, Crete, Nebraska, United States; 2 COMPASS, Seattle, Washington, United States; 3 Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, University of California, San Francisco, California, United States; 4 The Story Collider, New York, New York, United States; 5 Psychology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, United States
60 - Connecting with the media (Part II)
DESCRIPTION:
Connection with the media (Part I and II; 1 hour total time) will help scientists build the knowledge and skills they need to effectively engage with media members and the general public. Builing on Part I, in Part II session facilitators will lead attendees through a Message Box activity featuring each attendee's individual research efforts.
AUTHORS and/or PRESENTERS:
Raychelle Burks1 , Liz Neeley2 , Monica Feliu-Mojer3 , Danielle Lee4 , Ben Lillie5
1 Chemistry, Doane College, Crete, Nebraska, United States; 2 COMPASS, Seattle, Washington, United States; 3 Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, University of California, San Francisco, California, United States; 4 Psychology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, United States; 5 The Story Collider, New York, New York, United States
61 - Reaching your target audience after publication
DESCRIPTION:
Over 2.1 million papers are now published each year, and an increasing number of them are published in large Open Access journals. The growing challenge of filtration and curation makes it increasingly difficult for authors to successfully communicate their work to the right audience and contribute to the conversation in their field. Although much emphasis has been placed on the successful navigation of the publication process, very little is done by authors after publication to increase the discoverability of their work and connect the findings to a broader audience. How can authors ensure that their papers are discovered by their peers and understood by the general public? Research Square has been exploring new ways to bring scientific content to a larger group of interested readers. This presentation will discuss findings from experiments related to the effectiveness of content generation, keyword selection, and discoverability through multiple channels. This research reveals new approaches for authors to promote their research more effectively and prepare for the future of academic publishing. Laura
AUTHOR/PRESENTER:
Laura Stemmle , 1 Research Square, Durham, North Carolina, United States
62 - Scholarly journals in China involved in Friends circles: Promotion or profit
DESCRIPTION:
Although users in China cannot login YouTube, Twitter and even Google the Chinese scientists utilize social media tools and platforms to form Friends circles to communication. WeChat Public Platform and ScienceNet.cn become very popular among Chinese scientists. Scholarly journals in China are involved in Friends circles too for better connecting with authors, referees and readers. The presentation will give some examples to show how these new social media ways promote the journals and what a new business model will be for the scholarly journals in China.
AUTHOR/PRESENTER:
Xiaowen Zhu1 , 1 School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin, China

63 - ACS Crystal Growth & Design: Founding a journal in the cusp of electronic publishing and open access
DESCRIPTION:
Electronic publishing? Open access? As a scientist involved in the field of crystallography since I was an undergraduate (lets just say pre-personal computer and internet), all I can really say, is What took us so long?
I started my editorial career as Associate Editor of Journal of Crystallographic and Spectroscopic Research in 1993; a time firmly in the paper and print publication era. In 1999 I was asked by the American Chemical Society to found a new journal named Crystal Growth & Design, directed toward the remerging filed of solid state chemistry which involved the design and growth of crystalline materials. At that time the publishing dogma insisted that the print copy of a journal was the archival copy and that any paper published online had to be an exact copy of the print version. However, I was impatient for the same technology which was moving crystallography forward (including for example, immersive graphic displays of crystal structures which dramatically aided our understanding of crystal packing) to be included in our papers since they were going to be essentially on a computer anyway. Having dealt with a lot of electronic data, I was also impatient for all of the background data to be available online to the reader. But for our first issue in 2001, I was able to get one important concession, Web Enhanced Objects or WEOs. WEOs allowed readers of the online version to click on figures and allow them to rotate. Well, given an inch….
As evidenced by the text above, this presentation will cover a personal journey through the transition of scientific publishing from print to electronic formats. It will discuss an industry’s journey of resilience and adaptability to change. I consider this to be a success story which has many lessons for today’s chemical industry as it makes the decisions which will lead to transformative sustainable practice or to its demise. But for now, let’s take electronic publishing as a very positive object lesson.
AUTHOR/PRESENTER:
Robin D. Rogers, 1 Chemistry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada